It’s prognosis is far better, unless circulatory failure is prolonged. Treatment is aimed at restoring normal blood volumes and improving brain perfusion, thus the person should be placed flat or with their head slightly down. As soon as the person starts responding, a small amount of sugar water should be given. Heat exhaustion should also be treated with fluids and rest. Left untreated, it can progress to heat stroke, which can be deadly.  In heatstroke or sunstroke, an abrupt onset is sometimes preceded by headache, dizziness, and fatigue. Sweating is usually, but not always, decreased and the skin is hot, flushed and dry (usually). The pulse rate increases rapidly and may reach 160; respirations usually increase, but the blood pressure is seldom affected. Disorientation may briefly precede unconsciousness or convulsions. The body temperature can rapidly climb to 106 degrees or higher and the person feels as if he or she burning up. Circulatory collapse may precede death. After hours of extremely high fever, survivors are likely to have permanent brain damage. Treatment measures must be instituted immediately. If distant from a hospital, the person should be wrapped in wet clothing or fabric, or immersed in a lake or stream. The temperature should be taken every ten minutes, not allowing it to become too low. The person should be taken to a hospital as soon as possible after the emergency methods have been initiated. No fluids by mouth should be attempted. Bed rest is desirable for a few days after severe heatstroke, and body temperature fluctuations may be expected for weeks.  Protect your health during hot weather. Take a look at the following tips to prevent heat illness: Drink plenty of fluids. Regardless of your activity level, increase the amount of fluids you drink. Replace salt and minerals. Heavy sweating removes salt and beverages you have consumed from the body. Wear appropriate clothing and sunscreen. Choose lightweight, light colored, loose fitting clothing. In the hot sun, use sunscreen and don a wide-brimmed hat to provide shade and keep the head cool. Pace yourself. If you are unaccustomed to working or exercising in a hot environment, start slowly and pick up the pace gradually. Your body needs time to acclimate. Stay cool indoors. Air-conditioning is one of the best ways to stay cool. If you do not have an air conditioner or evaporative cooling unit, head for a shopping mall or public library for a few hours, or sit in front of a fan (with a wet towel draped around you, if necessary). Bathing is an effective way to cool off. Schedule outdoor activities carefully. Plan outdoor activities for the early morning or in the evening. While outdoors, rest frequently in a shady area. Use a buddy system. When working in the heat, monitor the condition of your co-workers and have someone do the same for you. Heat-induced illness can cause a person to become confused or to lose consciousness. Although Florida has a mild winter, the summers are extremely hot. With the temperatures already increasing, we are heading into the warmest time or the year. Enjoy what Florida has to offer, safely! 

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   A Mediterranean meal and dietary supplements of olive oil may cut your risk of cancer. Mediterranean populations have much lower death rates from heart disease and certain cancers than people in the U.S. and the consumption of olive oil may be a contributing factor. People who eat a Mediterranean diet actually eat as much fat as people from other countries, but they get their fat calories primarily from olive oil which is largely composed of monounsaturated fat which can lower blood cholesterol. Components of olive oil, such as oleic acid, vitamin E, flavonoids, squalene and polyphenols, may help protect against colon, breast and prostate cancer because flavonoids and polyphenols are antioxidants which help prevent cell damage from oxygen containing chemicals called free radicals. Consumption of monounsaturated fats also may be beneficial in preventing breast cancer. Several studies have shown that olive oil consumption could reduce the risk of cancer by up to 45 percent, which implies that women who consume olive oil have lower rates of breast cancer than women who do not consume olive oil. Olive oil may contribute to a healthy prostate in men. Fish cooked in olive oil may be the answer for men concerned about prostate cancer. A study published in The Lancet medical journal suggests that eating moderate amounts of oily fish might cut the risk of prostate cancer in half. Swedish men who ate fish fried in olive oil rarely on not at all were twice as likely to develop prostate cancer as those men who ate fish fried in olive oil frequently or moderately. A University of Oxford research study shows that olive oil is as effective as fresh fruit and vegetables as a cancer preventive measure. A team of researchers at the Institute of Health Sciences, led by Dr. Michael Goldacre, compared cancer rates, diets and olive oil consumption in 28 countries, including the United States, Brazil, Colombia, Canada and China. Countries with a diet high in meat and low in vegetables had the highest rates of cancer and the consumption of olive oil was associated with a decreased risk of colon cancer. The researchers suspect that olive oil protects against colon cancer by influencing the metabolism of the gut. 

The use of tumeric dates back as much as 10,000 years and was commonly used in China and India. In 1280 AD, Marco Polo recorded information on turmeric in his diary: “There is also a vegetable which has all the properties of true saffron, as well the smell as the color, and yet it is not really saffron.” Turmeric has since been used in Europe for over 700 years as a substitute for saffron, which is known to be the most expensive spice in the world.

Antioxidants are important nutrients that support your health by slowing free radical damage to your cells, organs and DNA. Turmeric helps to counteract this process with these curcuminoids that deliver antioxidants that may be 5 to 8 times stronger than vitamin E, stronger than vitamin C, 3 times more powerful than grape seed or pine bark extract, and strong enough to scavenge the hydroxyl radical that many consider to be the most reactive of all oxidants. Oxidation by free radicals damages cells and DNA, and negatively impacts the aging process. Antioxidants, in general, are key nutrients in supporting memory function, promoting heart health and boosting the immune system.

How to best benefit from turmeric: (1) supplements are recommended, as cooking can eliminate many beneficial properties. (2) Turmeric supplements should contain 100% certified organic ingredients, turmeric extract with at least 95% curcuminoids (3) read the supplement label in order to avoid fillers, additives, and excipients (“other ingredients”). (4) The supplement should use vegetable capsules; avoid gelatin-based capsules, if possible.

Pesky mosquitoes, they can can bite you, causing considerable itching, and annoy you, buzzing around your ears and coming out of hiding when it’s finally cool enough to enjoy being outside. Mosquitoes can carry disease, which makes mosquito control a priority and a huge drain to budgets in the 61 areas of Florida with mosquito control departments.

Mosquito research has revealed that the antennae of mosquitoes are able to distinguish about fifty different smells, but how to use this information for effective mosquito control is mostly unclear. One exception is a mosquito trap is being developed by Tanzanian scientists at the Ifakara Health Institute, to lure and kill malaria-causing mosquitoes that are attracted to the smell of human feet. This product is expected to be on the market within two years, at an estimated cost of between $4 to $27 per trap.

In Florida, the spread of malaria by mosquitoes was eradicated in the 1940’s. The most common serious illness spread by arthropods (mosquitoes AND ticks) we experience in Florida, today, is encephalities caused by arboviruses. The arboviruses include St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), West Nile virus (WNV), Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), Everglades encephalitis virus (EVEV), and California La Crosse encephalitis virus. People and animals infected with arboviruses are “dead-end hosts,” which means they do not further spread the disease.

Sentinel (warning) chickens are tested for the presence of mosquito borne illnesses. A positive test is a ‘warning’ that mosquitoes carrying disease are present in the area. Testing is also performed on mosquito pools, and people, animals or birds suspected of being infected. Nearby counties have had 9 positive test results this summer for SLEV and 1 positive result for WNV.

One actual case of Dengue Fever, “break-bone fever,” has been reported this summer in Marion County. This is a different virus which is also spread by mosquitoes. Symptoms include bone and muscle ache, pain behind the eye area, abnormal blood clotting and vascular permeability. It is rarely fatal unless the disease progresses to shock or encephalitis. Up to 50% of people infected with dengue do not display symptoms, but can still transmit the virus to mosquitoes.

Most cases of arboviral encephalitis occur from June through September, when mosquitoes are most active, but during a mild winter, mosquitoes can remain active during the winter months. Many people infected with an arbovirus have no symptoms at all. Many show only mild flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, achiness, and fatigue. Only in rare cases does an arbovirus become neuroinvasive, causing encephalitis and threatening life. The use of antibiotics and antiviral agents has not been shown effective in treating arboviral encephalitis, so treatment focuses on reducing serious complications such as swelling of the brain and respiratory distress.

Currently, their is no commercially available vaccine for humans against arboviruses, but some are in development for humans against WNV. There is a vaccine for horses against WNV and one available for horses, ostriches and emus against EEEV, WEEV and VEEV.

THE FIVE D’s of MOSQUITO PREVENTION are DAWN, DUSK, DRESS, DEET and DRAIN. The prevention of mosquito-borne disease relies on reducing the number of mosquitoes and avoiding mosquito bites. (1) During DAWN and (2) DUSK, avoid being outdoors because this is the time mosquitoes are most actively seeking blood. (3) DRESS in light-colored clothing that covers most of your skin. (4) DEET – Use insect repellents containing DEET and picaridin (most effective) or oil of lemon eucalyptus (less effective and cannot be used on children under the age of three). Permethrin can be applied to clothing and gear (but should not be applied to skin). Read the label to know how a repellent should be applied, how often to reapply it, and if it can be used on a child. No repellent should be used on an infant under the age of two months. Repellents should never be applied near a child’s eyes, ears or mouth or on a child’s hands. A repellent should never be sprayed ON a child; it should be applied to an adult’s hand, then rubbed onto a child’s skin. (5) DRAIN – Check around your property and get rid of common breeding grounds for mosquitoes, such as gutters, pet water dishes, and containers that can hold standing water, such as flower pots, buckets, bottles, pots and pans, coolers, and tires. Discard or store such containers upside-down or tightly closed, and change your pets’ water frequently. Old tires and appliances, other common breeding grounds for mosquitoes, should be hauled away. Pools and spas should have continuous circulation and/or appropriate chlorination.

Phone numbers of area mosquito control agencies: Levy County Mosquito Control (352) 486-5127, Citrus County Mosquito Control District (352) 527-7478, and City of Gainesville Mosquito Control (352) 393-8287.

(Sources: Florida Department of Health Mosquito Guide for 2011 and Live Science July 13, 2011.)

It amazes me how many choices we are faced with in today’s grocery stores. Check out the cereal aisle for starters. When I was a kid the choice my mother had was Post Toasties, Cheerios or Kelloggs Corn Flakes. Today there are so many cereals that it would take half a day to read all the labels and make a decision. Do you really there is that much difference between Captain Crunch and Lucky Charms? At best there is not a lot.
Growing up in the 50’s and 60’s our choices were few and far between. I ate enough lima beans in my Mother and Fathers household that I swore that I would never eat another lima again, Ever:  And I didn’t,  until one day about 15 years after I had left home and I got a craving for lima beans and rice. I called and got Mom’s instructions on how to prepare them and cooked them up.  As I recall they were pretty darn good.
My Mother was a food finder. Saturday was her grocery shopping day and sometimes on Friday night I would stare into the cupboard for something to munch on. Sometimes there wasn’t as much as a broken soda cracker in the house, or so it would seem. But Mom could find a meal or snack where there was slim pickings. One of my favorites was her cinnamon toast. She would spread margarine on a piece of bread, cover it with sugar and toast it. When it was done she sprinkled cinnamon on it: Eureka! We had a snack fit for a king.
Mom’s macaroni and cheese was one of my favorites. It had a crispy, hard top. She shredded the cheese with a grater and put it inside with the macaroni and sliced cheese for the top. In those days every household had a cheese grater. Now-a-days you buy cheese already shredded. The Macaroni and cheese you buy in a box these days is too mushy for me.
We had fried chicken every Sunday. We were a family of six and we had one chicken to feed the family. Trust me, every piece of that chicken, including the back, was consumed. We always had mashed potatoes and gravy and sometimes black-eyed peas to go with Sunday’s fare which we usually ate early. Mom had Sunday night off or to attend to other matters.
The meat departments in the old grocery store were pretty basic. The butchers, (we call them meat cutters today), had few cuts in their display cases. Round Steak, T-Bone and Chuck were the steaks. If you were like most folks you mostly bought the two alternatives, hamburger or chuck roast. We had roast beef about once every two weeks or so. The only steak we could afford was round steak.
I can’t complain about the diversity of foods on the market today, but I do think some people place too much value on what they put in their stomach. As my dear old Dad used to tell me, “some people live to eat, others eat to live”.   

Big Brother Has Traffic Control Cameras & May Send You a Fine of $158

Part I
Rita Surber of Inglis called The Newscaster Comment Line recently, complaining about receiving a traffic ticket in the amount of $158 due to one of the traffic enforcement cameras in Dunnellon snapping a picture of her car tag.

The intersection where the incident took place is U.S. Hwy. 41 at Powell Rd. during late afternoon on Dec. 20. She said she turned right on a red light after coming to a stop, at least she thought she had completely stopped until she received notification of the violation and fine. “I had been turning there for over twenty years and had never gotten a violation,” she said. The notice informed her that she would not receive points against her driver’s license if she paid the fine prior to the due date. “But I think, if you receive a violation on something, you should also receive points,” Surber said. The notice informed her that it was sent in relation to the Dunnellon Police Department’s Intersection Safety Program, and instructed her to send the $158 to an address in Tempe, Arizona. “It’s a rip-off,” she chuckled good naturedly, “A way of theft.” Her husband also commented. “Crooked,” he said, several times.

Dunnellon’s traffic light cameras were installed in late October – two at U.S. 41 and Powell Rd., one at U.S. 41 North and Brooks St., and one at U.S. 41 South. Warnings were issued the first thirty days, but violators now receive fines of $158.

This brought to mind a complaint I’d heard about a similar camera enforcement program in Louisiana by a man who purchased his son an older-model SUV, but left it in his name since he would be paying the insurance. In the two years since he purchased the SUV, he’s paid slightly more that $1,000 in camera-related fines for various offenses, such as his son speeding on off-ramps or running red lights. Since his son doesn’t want his father lecturing him about the fines, he’s avoided telling his father about the fines until they’re past the due dates and the fines have greatly increased. I feel that this is a good example of why many parents turn prematurely gray! Luckily for the father, points are not accumulated against a vehicle owner’s driver’s license in Louisiana for camera-related traffic offenses because the camera can’t identify the driver of the vehicle.

A decade-long legislative battle ensued in the State of Florida before former Gov. Charlie Crist signed HB325 into law in May of 2010, resulting in the Law of Florida 2010-80 taking effect on July 1, 2010. Within one month of the law taking effect, more than 50 Florida municipalities and cities were using the cameras. These cameras can address speeding and stopping violations, depending on the decisions of the municipalities using them.

The National Motorist Association opposes the use of the red light cameras and cites ten objections to them: they do not improve safety, there is no certifiable witness to alleged violations, ticket recipients are not adequately notified, the driver of the vehicle is not positively identified, ticket recipients are not notified quickly, they discourage the synchronization of traffic lights, they do not prevent most intersection accidents, there are better alternatives to cameras, they are designed to inconvenience motorists, and taking pictures of dangerous drivers does not stop the drivers (an example given is that a fugitive could speed through an intersection at 100 mph and not activate the camera as long as the light was green).

Part 2

Some argue that slight increases in the duration of yellow lights at intersections is a more effective and less costly way to increase traffic safety than safety cameras. One Dunnellon driver claims that the duration of the yellow light is actually shorter by one second since the traffic light cameras have been placed resulting in “more violations.” Another driver stated that he didn’t believe the charges against him until he went to the Dunnellon Police Department and viewed their video, which proved he was guilty.

A seven-year study in six Virginia jurisdictions led the Virginia Transportation Research Council to conclude that traffic cameras were associated with an increase in rear-end collisions. However, the use of the traffic cameras was abandoned by Norcross, Georgia in 2009, because violations dropped to the point that the privately-owned camera systems were costing the city revenue.

The legality of the traffic light cameras has been challenged, and several cities in various states have abandoned the use of them due to legal challenges. In general, those opposed to the cameras say that they deny alleged violators the right to confront their accusers and violate a person’s rights to privacy and due process. Many drivers feel victimized by automated monitoring and ticketing, feeling that it leaves them with little defense against being ticketed.

Although the tickets generated by the camera generally do not add points to a person’s driving record, they can effect a person’s ability to register their car or obtain/renew a license plate.

At the the Crystal River City Council meeting, Jan. 24, the council discussed, but took no action, on having the cameras installed at six major intersections to address the running of red lights. They discussed that the legality of the red light cameras was addressed by the Florida Legislature in several provisions of HB325, which went into effect in July 2010. One camera vendor, ATS, has developed a statistical model called Site Location System, or SLS, and will submit cost estimates for two options, one which assumes the City would not enforce right on red light violations and one which assumes that half the right on red light violators would be cited – the drivers who turn right in a “careful and prudent manner” and the owners of stolen cars would not be cited. No action has yet been taken, according to Councilman Mike Gudis who said the city council is still in the process of getting estimates from various companies and exploring with Citrus County Sheriff Jeff Dawsy his position on the traffic cameras. Gudis stated that Crystal River is not interested in monitoring right turns on red lights. “That’s not part of our thing,” he said. “It’s perfectly legal, if you come to a full stop first.”

Regarding the traffic cameras, “We know some other cities have done it. Dunnellon is one of them, and Port Richie is another one,” said Gudis, “And I think there’s been a couple of cities that have had them and done away with them. It’s still up in the air whether we go through with this or not.” Gudis said he’s in favor of the red light cameras, “Because I’ve had a near-miss myself, and I know a couple of people, personally, who’ve been hit by people who have not stopped at red lights,” Gudis added, “The financial part is not the most important thing, as far as I’m concerned – it’s the safety – saving people’s lives and saving them from injury.” Gudis said he’s gotten mixed reactions from the public. “Most of them said they didn’t like the idea, but it’s important from a safety standpoint. Only a few have said, ‘No. Don’t do it, at all.'”

When he was city councilman ten years ago, and since his re-election to the council in November, Gudis said he’s told law enforcement officials, “The most important safety hazard on the road is, in my opinion, running red lights, because I’ve seen so many accidents and potential accidents on the road. I almost got run over by an eighteen-wheeler on Ozello Rd. If there wasn’t another lane there, I would have been run over. It’s obvious that some people will definitely run red lights, unless there’s a way of catching them, and there is nothing to me more important than stopping people from running red lights. Speeding is one thing. Stop signs are not something you would normally go after. High speeds – well when you see these eighteen-wheelers and other people, driving down (Hwy.) 19 at 45 and 50 miles an hour and not stopping for a red light, I think that’s a lot of potential for problems.” Gudis paused and added, “I’m not in favor of Big Brother and cameras, but when it’s done to protect people’s lives, I think we have to do it.”

Although these traffic cameras at intersections are considered traffic safety devices, they are also well-known as an alternative form of revenue generation for many municipalities. Florida law designates the fines for red light violations at $158. Municipalities or counties may keep $75 of this amount and must pay for the costs associated with the monitoring out of their portion of the revenue. The remainder goes to the state. The cameras not only generate revenue for the municipalities, counties and states utilizing them, they also generate revenue for the companies marketing them and the companies selling wares to counter or avoid them. There’s a photo blocker spray, a product that claims to create an invisible coating when sprayed on a license plate that supposedly reflects the flash of a traffic camera back toward the camera, overexposing the photo. Then there’s the traffic camera detector that provides an early warning of nearby traffic cameras. Not to mention that you can download databases of traffic camera enforcement locations to your satellite navigation system (GPS), PDA or mobile phone to alert you to the presence of cameras in the areas you travel. But in all the controversy about the traffic cameras, there was no mention of driving at the posted speed, stopping for all red lights or stopping completely before turning right on red lights as an acceptable way to avoid being ticketed by the dreaded traffic cameras.

An on-road driving evaluation is most reliable

The subject of when a person should stop driving due to dementia or other mental or physical impairments is usually met with dread and/or resistance, because it’s often the first loss of independence the person will face.

A recent study in the journal, Neurology, found that up to 76% of people with mild dementia drive appropriately and are able to pass a road test. At some point in time, all dementia sufferers will have to stop driving, as the disease worsens and memory, spatial orientation, and cognitive function decreases.

Although caretakers are often proven correct when they express concern that a dementia suffer’s driving may not be safe, experts agree that the most reliable measure of driving ability is an on-road driving test, and the laws regarding the reporting of dementia to the Departments of Motor Vehicles vary, according the the state.

According to Florida law, any person who has knowledge that a licensed driver has a mental – or physical – driving impairment can submit a report to the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV). The DHSMV will notify the driver in writing, then investigate the report. If the report appears warranted, the DHSMV will test the driver. The law provides that no report can be used as evidence in any civil or criminal trial or proceeding, and anonymity is available.

If a person with dementia shows one or more of the following signs, itís time to have a serious conversation with the driver, his/her doctor, and/or the DHSMV: 1) stopping in traffic for no reason or ignoring traffic signs, 2) failing to signal or signaling inappropriately, 3) drifting into other lanes of traffic or driving on the wrong side of the street, 4) becoming lost on a familiar route, 5) parking inappropriately, 6) having difficulty seeing pedestrians or other vehicles, 7) having difficulty making turns or changing lanes, 8-becoming drowsy or falling asleep while driving, 9) lacking good judgment, 10) Having minor accidents or near misses.

Reasons other than dementia to consider a driving evaluation: 1) not seeing as well as in the past, 2) experiencing slowed reaction time or a loss of flexibility, 3) having a medical condition, chronic disease or physical limitation that may lead to a loss of range of motion, flexibility, or strength in the arms or legs, 4) a loss of peripheral (side) vision, depth perception, or other vision related change, 5) if you have been told that you should stop driving, and you do not agree.

If you stopped driving after an illness such as a stroke, an evaluation could show whether the stroke has affected your ability to drive safely and also point out strategies, rehabilitation therapies, or special equipment that could help you drive safely again. After a period of recovery time, coaching and retraining can prepare you to get back behind the wheel, sharpen your skills and build your confidence.

H1N1 FLU UPDATE LEVY COUNTY

                                  
LEVY COUNTY, Fl – Levy County Health Department continues to receive shipments of the H1N1 (Swine) Flu vaccine.  During the period when vaccine is in limited supply, Levy County Health Department is following vaccination recommendations made by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). The ACIP recommends that vaccination efforts initially focus on 5 target groups:
• Pregnant women
• People who live with or care for children younger than 6 months of age
• Healthcare and emergency medical services personnel
• Persons between the ages of 6 months and 24 years
• People ages 25 through 64 years who are at higher risk for complications because of chronic health disorders or compromised immune systems (due to medical therapy or disease)
 
 People in the target groups should not delay getting the vaccine. The health department is currently offering appointment based evening clinics, from 5-7 pm at the health department in Bronson, for people in the target groups. To schedule an appointment to receive the vaccine, call the Levy County Health Department at 486-5300 extension 261.
 
 The H1N1 vaccine is FREE and VOLUNTARY.  Levy County Health Department expects to include the general public when more vaccine becomes available.
 
Healthcare workers and first responders have been vaccinated. The health department is coordinating delivery of vaccine to local medical providers to give to patients in the target groups. We are in the process of providing H1N1 (Swine) Flu vaccine to the daycare and PreK population. Additionally, we have sent out consents to all elementary, middle and high school students in anticipation of administering the vaccine to them.
 

A Mediterranean meal and dietary supplements of olive oil may cut your risk of cancer. Mediterranean populations have much lower death rates from heart disease and certain cancers than people in the U.S. and the consumption of olive oil may be a contributing factor. People who eat a Mediterranean diet actually eat as much fat as people from other countries, but they get their fat calories primarily from olive oil which is largely composed of monounsaturated fat which can lower blood cholesterol. Components of olive oil, such as oleic acid, vitamin E, flavonoids, squalene and polyphenols, may help protect against colon, breast and prostate cancer because flavonoids and polyphenols are antioxidants which help prevent cell damage from oxygen containing chemicals called free radicals. Consumption of monounsaturated fats also may be beneficial in preventing breast cancer. Several studies have shown that olive oil consumption could reduce the risk of cancer by up to 45 percent, which implies that women who consume olive oil have lower rates of breast cancer than women who do not consume olive oil. Olive oil may contribute to a healthy prostate in men. Fish cooked in olive oil may be the answer for men concerned about prostate cancer. A study published in The Lancet medical journal suggests that eating moderate amounts of oily fish might cut the risk of prostate cancer in half. Swedish men who ate fish fried in olive oil rarely on not at all were twice as likely to develop prostate cancer as those men who ate fish fried in olive oil frequently or moderately. A University of Oxford research study shows that olive oil is as effective as fresh fruit and vegetables as a cancer preventive measure. A team of researchers at the Institute of Health Sciences, led by Dr. Michael Goldacre, compared cancer rates, diets and olive oil consumption in 28 countries, including the United States, Brazil, Colombia, Canada and China. Countries with a diet high in meat and low in vegetables had the highest rates of cancer and the consumption of olive oil was associated with a decreased risk of colon cancer. The researchers suspect that olive oil protects against colon cancer by influencing the metabolism of the gut. 

Citrus County’s prescription discount cards available on line

The Prescription Discount Card Program that county residents have
access to as a result of a partnership between the Citrus County
Commission and National Association of Counties (NACo) just got better.

The program’s free participation cards are for residents who do not
have insurance for prescription drugs or whose insurance does not cover
a specific drug. The cards, which get an average 20 percent discount,
have been distributed to and are available in most pharmacies in Citrus
County. In July, for example, Citrus residents saved $31,583 on
uninsured prescriptions.

Now, not only are the cards available online for downloading, but they
qualify residents for even more savings by getting some prescription
medication through the mail.

The convenient online option allows residents to print a dynamic ID
card with their name and an ID number on it directly from the Internet
for immediate use at any participating pharmacy. This new ID card is not
intended to replace the printed cards now in use. It’s designed to
broaden the ability of residents who don’t have insurance for
prescription drugs to use the county’s NACo Prescription Discount Card
to save money. The card is part of a discount program and is not an
insurance plan.

There is no enrollment form or no membership fee for the card, there is
no limit to use, and the cards can be used immediately for all family
members. To get a card online, residents can go to:
http://www2.caremark.com/naco.

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